More Fall Fishing Pictures from the Smoky Mountains

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Charity and I have had a chance to download a few more photos off of our cameras and thought we’d share them along with a fishing update.

It’s a wet day today, but it’s been rather light so far and we’re not anticipating any substantial rise in stream levels. At this point the biggest issue will be with wind dropping leaves into the rivers and streams. You can still fish when leaves are in the water, but it can get a bit aggravating. Dry flies hook a few leaves, nymphs hook more, and streamers seem to snag drifting debris every cast.

A trout rises among leaves drifting in the current

A trout rises among leaves drifting in the current

A brown trout holds in the current

A brown trout holds in the current

Shuler Pelham fishes Little River near Elkmont

Shuler Pelham fishes Little River near Elkmont

It looks like the fish rise pretty well around 3:00 in the afternoon

It looks like the fish rise pretty well around 3:00 in the afternoon

Julie Tallman catches her first brown trout in a while

Julie Tallman catches her first brown trout in a while

Yesterday Charity took Julie Tallman out for an afternoon of fly fishing on Little River. Julie has been a long time customer of ours and one of the most enthusiastic anglers we know. She had some serious back surgery a few months back and hasn’t been able to do anything near the unstable footing of a trout stream.

We’re proud to report Julie’s back in effect. She still has to take it easy, but she’s back to hooking wild fish in the Smokies.

Tailwaters

Tailwater flows have been all over the place, but there are some places to consider for anyone who wants to get on some bigger water this week. The Clinch is not wadeable, but flows have subsided to on generator. That’s an ideal schedule for a float. Dead drift nymphs or rip big streamers.

The South Holston and Watauga are our top pick for tailwater fishing right now. Flows are ideal, but keep an eye on the schedule at the South Holston. You might have to move locations but you won’t get blown out. This is prime Blue Wing Olive weather.

Over in North Carolina the Tuckaseegee and Nantahala are both good for waders. The Tuck will have some high water, but you can always find a few spots to wade around Dillsboro. The Nantahala Delayed Harvest section seems to get the most attention from fly fishers this time of year, but we’re tried and true fans of the big river below the powerhouse. There is no generation this month and there are plenty of fish here. Granted, they are tougher than trout above the powerhouse, but many of these are wild fish too. Expect good hatches of Blue Wing Olives and midges.

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Comments

  1. Ian,
    Why no generation on the Nantahala this month? With all the rain, I would have thought they would be releasing water 24 hours a day. Sounds like I need to make a road trip.

    • Wayne,

      I should have clarified; there is some work being done on the dam or powerhouse (not sure which) but the lake was drawn down particularly low by the first of October. The power plant is scheduled to be offline until December 31. Lots of time to take advantage.